Read Seeking Sickness: Medical Screening and the Misguided Hunt for Disease by Alan Cassels H. Gilbert Welch Online

seeking-sickness-medical-screening-and-the-misguided-hunt-for-disease

Why wouldn't you want to be screened to see if you're at risk for cancer, heart disease, or another potentially lethal condition? After all, better safe than sorry. Right?Not so fast, says Alan Cassels. His Seeking Sickness takes us inside the world of medical screening, where well-meaning practitioners and a profit-motivated industry offer to save our lives by exploitingWhy wouldn't you want to be screened to see if you're at risk for cancer, heart disease, or another potentially lethal condition? After all, better safe than sorry. Right?Not so fast, says Alan Cassels. His Seeking Sickness takes us inside the world of medical screening, where well-meaning practitioners and a profit-motivated industry offer to save our lives by exploiting our fears. He writes that promoters of screening overpromise on its benefits and downplay its harms, which can range from the merely annoying to the life threatening. If you're facing a screening test for breast or prostate cancer, high cholesterol, or low testosterone, someone is about to turn you into a patient. You need to ask yourself one simple question: Am I ready for all the things that could go wrong?...

Title : Seeking Sickness: Medical Screening and the Misguided Hunt for Disease
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781771000321
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 192 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Seeking Sickness: Medical Screening and the Misguided Hunt for Disease Reviews

  • Laura
    2019-03-23 07:13

    This is a very interesting book. The author explores how screening healthy people for diseases as opposed to using screening as a diagnostic tool when there are symptoms present, can actually make you sicker. He contends that there are many false positive results and the resulting anxiety and subsequent tests a person undergoes if they don't take a wait and see attitude can be quite detrimental to people. He also points out that screening tests that have been used for decades may not need to be used as often as we are told, however, since that doesn't go with what we believe based on what we've been told, and because special interest groups and agencies cry foul, we continue in the way that wehave always known.There is so much in this book and I found it so interesting that it is hard to summarize it all. I would recommend this book even if you aren't interested in this type of thing. One day the question the author asks, and what we may have to ask, is 'what happens if I do nothing?'

  • Debs
    2019-03-17 03:33

    This was a quick, easy, accessible read with clear writing, thanks in part to the way it was organized with each major diagnostic test getting its own chapter. It had more of an essay/thesis feel than a book feel, to me. I also found it a bit topographical in that it covered a lot but didn't go into a huge amount of detail on each topic. Medical screening is one of those things that most people don't think twice about. The main message, instead of being "Medical screening is a useless waste of time," is more about the approach you should take toward it: "Think critically, don't assume and ask questions". I liked that, because it made the book come across as more balanced.

  • Patricia
    2019-03-25 02:15

    This book will be for some a revelation but if you have ever been involved in diagnostic testing in particular routine screening then there are few shocks here. The value in this book lies in the analysis of many routine screening tests that many patients and doctors rely on. He covers many, PSA, PAP, cholesterol and gives the empiric evidence for each. Cassels also provides the reader with sound advice on what questions we should pose when a routine test is suggested by the doctor. Well researched and a gem of a book.

  • Argum
    2019-03-06 06:35

    While overall well presented information about screening guidelines and role it should play, the agenda is a bit heavy handed. THis is especially in play in the colon cancer chapter where a non standard unusual Virtual Colonoscopy is used in placed of the more usual screening tests. It reeks of agenda while never actually crossing the line because it is acknowledged as unusual. The author though is fear mongering as much as the drug companies he slams for inventing diseases in other chapters.

  • Karla
    2019-03-22 00:33

    An interesting read about medical screening - how the providers overstate the benefits, understate the risks and make a lot of money doing so.

  • Science For The People
    2019-02-25 00:24

    Featured on Skeptically Speaking show #173 on July 15, 2012, during an interview with author Alan Cassels. http://skepticallyspeaking.ca/episode...