Read The Beast Under the Wizard's Bridge by Brad Strickland John Bellairs Online

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What is it about the old Wilder Creek Bridge that makes Lewis Barnavelt so curious-and so afraid? When Lewis and his best friend Rose Rita Pottinger set out to explore the bridge and the deserted farm nearby, they discover shocking secrets—and a horrifying monster. Even Lewis's Uncle Jonathan and the magical Mrs. Zimmermann may not be able to vanquish this ferocious creatuWhat is it about the old Wilder Creek Bridge that makes Lewis Barnavelt so curious-and so afraid? When Lewis and his best friend Rose Rita Pottinger set out to explore the bridge and the deserted farm nearby, they discover shocking secrets—and a horrifying monster. Even Lewis's Uncle Jonathan and the magical Mrs. Zimmermann may not be able to vanquish this ferocious creature! "[Strickland's] characters ring true in this entertaining page-turner that will captivate readers." —VOYA "A wonderful blend of mystery, adventure, ghosts, and friendship." —School Library Journal...

Title : The Beast Under the Wizard's Bridge
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780142300657
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 160 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Beast Under the Wizard's Bridge Reviews

  • JustinK. Rivers
    2019-03-15 20:13

    There’s a bad omen that begins with this book and continues in the next one. It’s the “reference things from better titles in the series” syndrome, and it doesn’t bode well. Unlike some rather vocal critics who dismiss Strickland’s writing, I am quite comfortable defending his work continuing the series. He even has even polished up some aspects that Bellairs never really bothered with. But in this book, Strickland seems to be losing focus. Either that or he’s got an editor who is pushing him to make callbacks to earlier titles. It’s as if he’s trying to remind people why they loved the originals so much.The rest of the series from here on is all Lewis Barnavelt. It seems to be a mercenary decision – Lewis is the star of Bellairs most popular and acclaimed novel, after all. But there’s a reason that Bellairs left the Barnavelts behind and turned instead to Johnny Dixon and Professor Childermass – the world of Lewis and Uncle Jonathan doesn’t quite have the flexibility that Johnny’s world has. Subsequently, when Strickland tries to open it up a bit more, you get some problems. At this point, Lewis really ought to have grown as a character. But instead we see him back to his old stuff, being nervous about random things. In this case, it’s the most random thing and takes up at least a third of the novel: bridge-o-phobia. That’s right, Lewis is seriously worried because the county is tearing down an old bridge that made a brief appearance in The House With a Clock In Its Walls, for absolutely no viable reason. The plot hinges on this, and that’s where the book falls apart. Add to that yet another conveniently found creepy manuscript and some really out of place Lovecraft references, and you have a story that doesn’t work. I don’t mind the idea of having a Lovecraft-based story in a Bellairs world. But Strickland specifically references the guy several times, calling way too much attention to a mythology that is not really accessible to a) the kids who ostensibly read these books and b) most people in general, because the mythology is very convoluted and crazy. And the flavor of Lovecraft is rather different from the flavor of Bellairs. The two styles don’t quite mesh. This should have been a Bellairs-style treatment of Lovecraft, but instead it becomes “Bellairs with random Cthulu action.” That would be a great title of a painting. Some good things about this book – a few psychological turns from the various “villains,” a memorable monster, and Edward Gorey’s last artwork for the series. A weak story that shows the need to move Lewis forward as a character.

  • David Serxner
    2019-03-20 19:08

    This title involves some of the action from Bellairs' first Lewis Barnavelt book, The House with the clock in its walls. Is it as good? No, not really. It is still good, but Brad Strickland's continuation of the series is not as well done as I had hoped. I know that the two are different writers, and that they have different styles; but Strickland is dealing with well established characters. Sometimes things feel a little forced. Also, by now I would think that Lewis would have gotten a little bit of a spine.

  • Marjanne
    2019-03-08 22:11

    I really enjoyed this book. It was the Edward Gorey illustrations that caught my attention, but the story was a lot of fun. I liked that it had a similar feel to the Lemony Snicket series, though much less cynical and just a quick of a read. It is geared toward a younger reader, though I think many adults would enjoy it. I think I will probably read all the other books that I can find by John Bellairs and/or Brad Strickland. Also, it is a good warm up for the coming Halloween season.

  • Noah Stevens
    2019-02-25 01:13

    If it weren't for this book there'd be no Harry PotterToo brief - but the style is so like Bellairs' that I can't tell the difference. If you're not into Mythos creatures a la Lovecraft, best to avoid.

  • Erin
    2019-03-03 22:18

    I adore this series, but this one was just a bit weird, compared to the others. It was creepier, but not in a way I enjoyed as much. Perhaps it was all the space talk and the creepy mass thing that came out of the river.

  • Loki
    2019-02-20 00:12

    I liked it. It seemed like a series because it talked like there's gonna be another trouble coming up. I didn't like the end because it was pretty short. They took care of everything too quickly. I liked the middle part.

  • Bruce Nordstrom
    2019-03-15 19:19

    Really not very frightening. Hard to raise the interest to keep reading. I think this is too juvenile for me.

  • Miriam
    2019-02-27 00:04

    Strickland's homage to Lovecraft.

  • Awake at Midnight
    2019-03-12 18:24

    This is a childrens' version of a Cthulhu Mythos story by August Derleth, called Horror from the Middle Span.

  • Aaron
    2019-03-04 17:20

    I liked this book well enough that I am checking out more in the series. Fun, light, entertaining read.

  • Douglas
    2019-03-21 23:02

    I have always enjoy the John Bellairs characters the Brad Stickland continues to write about. I miss reading such stories to my girls