Read The Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave by William Wells Brown Online

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Brother, you have often declared that you would not end your days in slavery. I see no possible way in which you can escape with us; and now, brother, you are on a steamboat where there is some chance for you to escape to a land of liberty. I beseech you not to let us hinder you. If we cannot get our liberty, we do not wish to be the means of keeping you from a land of freBrother, you have often declared that you would not end your days in slavery. I see no possible way in which you can escape with us; and now, brother, you are on a steamboat where there is some chance for you to escape to a land of liberty. I beseech you not to let us hinder you. If we cannot get our liberty, we do not wish to be the means of keeping you from a land of freedom....

Title : The Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781428033931
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 116 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave Reviews

  • Miles Smith
    2019-04-28 01:56

    Brown's narrative shares none of the US nationalism of other escape narratives. Brown maintained an indifference to the patriotism that motivated other abolitionists. He also hailed from Missouri instead of the Atlantic South, making this unique escape narrative even more exceptional for its betrayal of a region on the periphery of Unites States slavery

  • Christopher Sutch
    2019-04-27 00:49

    This is a fascinating and often thoughtful meditation on Brown's experiences as a slave in Missouri, and his resultant reflections on the institution of slavery. The contrast with Douglass's narrative provides several grounds for interesting comparison. Brown was enslaved to a "slave driver" delivering slaves up and down the Mississippi and saw the inner mechanisms of the slave market from a rather unique perspective (especially interesting is the incident in which he helps his master blacken the hair of an older slave to make him appear younger, thus cheating the eventual purchaser). He is also very harsh in his condemnations of the religious basis and justification of slavery in the South, several times highlighting the irony of the mistreatment of black brethren in Christ by their white masters; one even sold a member of his church down the river. Very fascinating little book.

  • Tammy M Jenislawski
    2019-05-17 22:57

    Very good read, Very informativeI can't believe what slaves went through during that time. In history class in school they teach you very little what they had to endure. This book goes a little deeper than that. It's horrifying that people could be so cruel and inhumane to people because of their color. Unfortunately there still is racism today. We are all the same, doesn't matter what color our skin is, what nationality we are, or what part of the world we are from. We all FEEL...

  • Nathan Ellzey
    2019-05-04 01:59

    This is a short, easy read about an escaped slave from St. Louis, MO. William Wells Brown's story is one of courage, suffering, and finally freedom.

  • Omari
    2019-05-11 23:02

    Good readSolid slave narrative. The beauty of this work is in the way Brown conveys his struggle. A necessary part of the slave cannon.

  • Bob
    2019-05-03 23:02

    Of course, I've read and heard many accounts over the years of the systematic brutalities and humiliations inflicted upon slaves in 19th century America, but there is something particularly chilling about hearing the first-hand accounts of one who endured it. I was much struck by the multiple examples he gave of churches where masters and their slaves were both counted as members. How could a church tolerate such hypocrisy as to allow the contradiction that someone would be a member on Sunday but a piece of chattel property the other six days of the week? God forgive us!

  • Furqan
    2019-05-15 03:50

    Excellent bookExcellent book from an enslave person in america. I love the honesty of this writer and how he articulates 19 century america.