Read The Films of Jean-Luc Godard: Seeing the Invisible by David Sterritt Online

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In this study, David Sterritt offers an introductory overview of Godard's work as a filmmaker, critic, and video artist. In subsequent chapters, he traces Godard's visionary ideas through six of his key films, including Breathless, My Life to Live, Weekend, Numero deux, Hail Mary, and Nouvelle vague. Also included is a concise analysis of Godard's work in video, televisionIn this study, David Sterritt offers an introductory overview of Godard's work as a filmmaker, critic, and video artist. In subsequent chapters, he traces Godard's visionary ideas through six of his key films, including Breathless, My Life to Live, Weekend, Numero deux, Hail Mary, and Nouvelle vague. Also included is a concise analysis of Godard's work in video, television, and mixed-media formats. Linking Godard's works to key social and cultural developments, The Films of Jean-Luc Godard explains their importance in modernist and postmodernist art of the past half century....

Title : The Films of Jean-Luc Godard: Seeing the Invisible
Author :
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ISBN : 9780521589710
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 316 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Films of Jean-Luc Godard: Seeing the Invisible Reviews

  • Christopher
    2019-04-26 23:07

    In this entry in the Cambridge Film Classics series, David Sterritt attempts to survey the work of the French filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard up to the book’s publication in 1999 (Godard has produced a number of films in the years since). However, Godard's work was so prodigious that Sterrit decided to focus only on six films as representative of his whole career. These are À bout de souffle, Vivre sa vie, Weekend, Numéro deux, Hail Mary, and Nouvelle Vague. A final chapter is dedicated to Godard’s several works for television and video, which remain little-known.This book left me with mixed feelings. As an attempt to cover Godard's entire career, this book is much less effective than the survey by Richard Brody that was published a decade later,Everything is Cinema, which actually does manage to cover all of Godard's films to date instead of trying to make a representative selection, and in such a clear and enjoyable style that the much greater length of Brody's book still goes by more quickly than Sterritt's 300-odd pages. With his page limitations, Sterritt just couldn't produce the same comprehensive introduction.Also, Sterritt’s book all too often interrupts a clear description and convincing analysis of Godard’s work to reference postmodern writers for academic street cred. I don't feel that his citations of Kristeva and Lacan bring anything to Godard’s work. And finally, Godard’s films since the mid-1960s have contained an enormous amount of quotation, and Sterritt doesn't get it all. He is baffled by the drummer singing a paean to the "ancient ocean" in WEEKEND, unaware that it is drawn from the Comte de Lautréamont’s Les chants de maldoror. A knowledge of the French canon is essential towards getting the most out of Godard's work and relating it to a general audience, but Sterritt apparently lacks that grounding in French culture (most of his published work is on English and American films).Still, there *may* be enough material here to make the book worthwhile for Godard fans who have already read Brody's book. I like how Sterritt chooses Numéro deux – still a shocking achievement today and woefully underappreciated – as an important cornerstone of Godard’s career. The chapter on the television and video efforts is also welcome, as while Godard's 1970s experiments are now easier to get ahold of thanks to the internet, those interested in Godard will appreciate a description of this body of work before dedicating themselves to, say, the 312 minutes of France/tour/détour/deux/enfants.

  • brian
    2019-05-11 00:39

    PRAISE GOD(ard)!